All posts by Parise Peter

English Teacher, researcher

Focus on form(s): principles and practice

A great review of focus on form for L2 learning. I think my approach is more proactive than reactive. Thank you Shona Whyte for sharing.

on teaching languages with technology

The teaching of grammar is a frequent topic of debate among language teachers. Should we teach our learners the rules of grammar explicitly? If so, when and how do we do this? Or is it better to allow learners to pick up rules about the formal features of language in other ways, perhaps while they attempt to communicate, that is, focus on meaning? Sheen (2002) expresses this dilemma in these terms:

… on the one hand, there are those who advocate minimal to no interruption in communication, limiting attention to grammar by means of corrective feedback (Doughty and Varela 1998); on the other, there are those who advocate separate attention to grammar and subsequent integration of the knowledge provided in increasingly communicative activity (DeKeyser 1998)

Sheen (2002)

The traditional approach to language teaching has generally involved explicit grammar teaching, referred to by Long and colleagues as focus on formS,

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November 08, 2017 at 07:56PM

Time to check in…..

Hello readers, yes it’s a blue moon and time to take some time even though there is no time to post here. I see this as almost a more detailed journal that is public. It’s nice every once and a while to think about where I am in this career of mine and look back.

So where to start…when I last posted I was halfway finished with my coursework. I finished my last course in January 2017, had the Qualifying Exam in early May and after passing that settled into the dissertation proposal writing phase. I explain it so matter-of-factly as if it was a stroll in the park. I was not, to say the least.

Two things impacted me the most. One was not seeing my cohort buddies every week. I felt like I bonded with them, and I enjoyed the lectures, the discussions, the sharing. Then it was just over. In its wake was a gap in my life that was hard to fill.

The second was the Qualifying Exam. This was an open book test, where we had to write several essays and solve some statistical problems. I took a week over Golden Week to finish. I was writing and thinking at my computer the whole time. The closest I can compare this experience is a zen retreat. When you are in such a situation the schedule runs you, not the other way around. I’ve had my share of zen and believe me when you finish one of these retreats, you are done!

But you come out of that experience transformed. I think the intensity of the Temple program sharpens you up. You become like a tiger running in the jungle, shreading and ingesting journal articles with ease. Finding the strengths and weaknesses of a study, evaluating its methods and results. All those murky things about social science become plain to see.

Now the coursework is finished. It is time to stop being a student. I have to struggle with writing my proposal, working one on one with my advisors, and prepare my defense hopefully by next year, assuming life doesn’t get in the way. But it does and it will happen. It’s already happening to me now. But that is not going to stop me. No matter what….just keep going, tiger.
via Do Note http://ift.tt/2AjYFKV

A smorgasboard of DDL journal activity

A recent report on DDL by Michael Brown. It’s great to see more DDL studies get published because I think since the technology is more accessible, it can become a more common teaching practice.

Corpus Linguistics 4 EFL

Last month, in addition to the release of new corpora, two journals released special issues dedicated to DDL/CL in language learning.

One is the open-access Language Learning & Technology. I haven’t read it yet, but the table of contents looks very interesting. The other one is Language Testing. It’s interesting to see how CL and questions of assessment interact.

Finally, though not a whole dedicated issue, ReCALL has an online first article titled ‘Unlearning overgenerated be through data-driven learning in the secondary EFL classroom’. This will be the first article I get to, as overgenerated be is a recurring issue for many of my students and I’m curious to see what the authors found.

What bounty 🙂


UPDATE

If the ReCALL link above isn’t working for you, here is the doi: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0958344017000246

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July 27, 2016 at 07:40AM

Long time no see,

I has been a while. Blogging is something I have neglected lately and it is not so easy to seemlessly integrate my work as a teacher trainer, my Ph.D coursework, and my personal life into the mix. If anyone has the ultimate formula for doing this please comment below.

Most of the time I have used this blog to document my presentations at conferences here in Japan, which is fine for now. The one major personal and professional paradigm shift for me is deciding to get a Ph.D at Temple University. Not an easy decision to make, but after almost two years of coursework I have come to apprecite the wealth of information and community that has come with it. But this is only the beginning, which means clarifying a research agenda, dissertaion proposal, writing, and the defence. How does one keep going? One piece of advice I got is passion. Without passion for something that genuinely interests you, there can be no moving forward. I couldn’t agree more with this.
I will keep you posted on how far passion has taken me.
via Do Note http://ift.tt/2afeFBv

Reflections on my presentation at the Temple University Japan Applied Linguistics Colloquium 2016

Today another TUJ Colloquium is behind us…

I want to say thank you for attending my talk this afternoon. I greatly appreciate your support, and the feedback I received afterward, reminding me of what Mischler (1990) said: research is a craft. The beauty of the colloquium is the supportive atmosphere it provides to hone our craft.

The talk I gave today is titled Think Aloud vs. Stimulus Recall: Obtaining Responses to Writing Feedback in which I discussed my use of two different protocols for interviewing my learners in my blended writing  Continue reading..

Presenting at JALT 2015!!!!

It’s been a busy year for me and so please forgive me for being a stranger for this blogsite.

Anyway, I will be involved with two presentations at JALT this year. If you are in the neighborhood ( Shizuoka, Japan) be sure to check them out.

Teachers as Learners: Challenges for Training

Teacher Beliefs About Student Group and Pair Work

 

 

英文ライティング添削講座-Support Writing Course for 2015

Group 1 for Kanagawa Teachers

英文ライティング添削講座

Support Writing Course for 2015

at 神奈川県立国際言語文化アカデミア

A new academic year is here and now is a good time to practice writing.

So If you, or someone you know who is a junior high or high school English teacher in Kanagawa and is interested in working on their writing in English, please check this link for more details.

英文ライティング添削講座

http://www.pref.kanagawa.jp/cnt/f440038/p899374.html

5月28日- 7月23日
9月17日-12月9日

Thank you and we look forward to studying with you.

宜しくお願い致します。

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Keywords List – AntConc

A nice explanation of AntConc and its Keyword list function by Warren Tang.
I started using AntConc again for some qualitative research and discovered this while searching for advice. Thanks Warren for posting!

In Other Words

The keywords list in AntConc is, as the name suggests, a tool to create a list of keywords. To do this your target corpus is compared to a reference corpus. The target and reference corpora do not need to be of the same size. The comparison is then done statistically. The statistics in AntConc used for this task are either chi-squared and log-likelihood.

In AntConc load your corpus or corpora. Go to Wordlist tab then click start.

make wordlist

Select the Tools Preference menu.

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References for my presentation at the Temple University Applied Linguistic Colloquium 2015

The presentation went well, learned a lot and for those who saw please have a look here, presentation posting on the way!

http://tesolpeter.renshuishere.com/references-for-my-presentation-at-the-temple-university-applied-linguistics-colloquium-2015/