Category Archives: data visualisation

Don’t Go Down the Google Books Garden Path

Interesting post here about the Google Ngram viewer and its limitations. One possible limitation about this viewer is if the amount of literature for each time period included are normalized, in other words are all the texts in Google Books represented in equal amount, or would it be possible that there are more texts from the 20th century and after compared to before? Since the data for all this comes from Google books itself, is it just a raw reading of the data, or are the years normalized? I have only casually looked into this tool, so I don’t know if this is true or not. If anybody knows the Google NGram viewer well or uses it on a regular basis, feel free to comment.

...And Read All Over

When Google?s Ngram Viewer was the topic of a post on Science-Based Medice, I knew it was becoming mainstream. No longer happy to only be toyed with by linguists killing time, the Ngram Viewer had entranced people from other walks of life. And I can understand why. Google?s Ngram Viewer is an impressive service that allows you to quickly and easily search for the frequency of words and phrases in millions of books. But I want to warn you about Google?s Ngram Viewer. As a corpus linguist, I think it?s important to explain just what Ngram Viewer is, what it can be used to do, how I feel about it, and the praise it has been receiving since its inception. I?ll start out simple: despite all its power and what it seems to be capable of, looks can be deceiving.

Have we learned nothing?

Jann Bellamy wrote a post

View original post 1,809 more words

The Ultimate Guide To Infographics | Edudemic

See on Scoop.itComputer Aided Language Learning

An excellent guide to Infographics: a blend of data and design to presnet information in a visual form. This appoach is a more accesable way to communicate because, as Mark Smiciklas, author of the book The Power of Infographics: Using Pictures to Communicate and Connect with Your Audiences, states; vision accounts for 50% of the brains functions.

What I like about this article is the discussion about its applications for education with some links to how to apply it in your classroom.

See on edudemic.com

Many Eyes

See on Scoop.itComputer Aided Language Learning

Data visualization site by IBM open for public use. Ideal for presentations, discussions, poster sessions, and other classroom activities. For language learning, click “Visualization types” and look at “Analyze a text” for word clouds and word trees etc.

 

Enjoy!

See on www-958.ibm.com

Data visualization discovery: potential for classroom/ CALL use!

Data visualization discovery: potential for classroom/ CALL use!

Work and employment is one topic of discussion. But one way to present the topic in a CALL environment would be to have students use this handy post I discovered on  the BBC news site comparing work hours. One idea here would be to have students enter the number of days they work if they have a job, or if they don’t work they could enter the data of someone they know (parent, friend, etc.) or maybe their “ideal” work hours.  Then they could talk about their work situation, make comparisons with other countries and/or other students situations. You can also access the related article about Who gets the most time off? for more discussion material.

I recommend giving this a try yourself!

But would this be appropriate in some cultures to talk about their occupation with others? For North Americans is fine but for other countries it might be taboo. What do you think?

Art, Drawing : Art-technique online flashcards from SwipeStudy

See on Scoop.itTeaching and Researching Language Learning

A really user friendly application for personal and classroom vocabulary practice.

http://www.swipestudy.com/

I was actually able to make some kanji cards in a matter of minutes. Probably one of the easiest I’ve encountered for making flashcards.

Below is a sample account that you can try.

Art%2C+Drawing, spelling+%26+vocabulary+%3Cbr%2F%3E SwipeStudy Online Flashcard web-app study tool (helping someone study Art, Drawing – spelling & vocabulary
#flashcards #learning #studytips http://t.co/fZbfulzM...)…

Enjoy,

See on www.swipestudy.com

The “March” of Time….. and a new academic year “Springs” into action!

For those who live outside of Japan, one thing I would like you to know is that we start the new year in the Spring. In fact not only school but anyone starting a new job usually gets under way from April 1st. Everyone’s life seems to restart in April, just in time for the cherry blossoms…..There is talk about changing over to starting in September like the rest of the world, but if we did that the symbolism would be lost…

So much for poetry…. on with the nitty gritty…

I will be moving on from Rikkyo University to be to serve as a trainer for teacher development in Kanagawa prefecture to teach elementary, junior high and high school teachers language teaching techniques and cultural awareness.

It is a fresh start for me, and one that has a lot of potential and a lot of challenges too. Where can I take my research from here?

At Rikkyo the concepts of  fluency development, vocabulary and syntactic priming, vocabulary development, and using data visualisation became part of my research and teaching practice. Even though we had a very specific teaching approach, I felt Rikkyo supported me in my research interests and will always feel a great deal of gratitude for the Discussion Center and the staff there. There is a real community of teachers, and I really felt supported. If you get a chance to teach there by all means take advantage of it.

With Kanagawa I will hope to bring what I have learned to public school teachers, but also I hope to be an example of someone who can be enthusiastic about teaching. Interesting things are falling into place and I hope I can make a worthwhile contribution.

Keeping busy but loving it!

Highlights of the past year was getting published in a book by the JALT CALL sig called CALL:What’s Your Motivation? in which I wrote an article about Wordle and how it can be useful in the language classroom.

While it is great to write about other web-based applications, especially ones that can help with data-driven learning, this year I also want to focus on my own studies, maybe in relation to these applications or something related with language learning in general. Stay tuned for more in the months ahead.