Category Archives: ESL

November 08, 2017 at 07:56PM

Time to check in…..

Hello readers, yes it’s a blue moon and time to take some time even though there is no time to post here. I see this as almost a more detailed journal that is public. It’s nice every once and a while to think about where I am in this career of mine and look back.

So where to start…when I last posted I was halfway finished with my coursework. I finished my last course in January 2017, had the Qualifying Exam in early May and after passing that settled into the dissertation proposal writing phase. I explain it so matter-of-factly as if it was a stroll in the park. I was not, to say the least.

Two things impacted me the most. One was not seeing my cohort buddies every week. I felt like I bonded with them, and I enjoyed the lectures, the discussions, the sharing. Then it was just over. In its wake was a gap in my life that was hard to fill.

The second was the Qualifying Exam. This was an open book test, where we had to write several essays and solve some statistical problems. I took a week over Golden Week to finish. I was writing and thinking at my computer the whole time. The closest I can compare this experience is a zen retreat. When you are in such a situation the schedule runs you, not the other way around. I’ve had my share of zen and believe me when you finish one of these retreats, you are done!

But you come out of that experience transformed. I think the intensity of the Temple program sharpens you up. You become like a tiger running in the jungle, shreading and ingesting journal articles with ease. Finding the strengths and weaknesses of a study, evaluating its methods and results. All those murky things about social science become plain to see.

Now the coursework is finished. It is time to stop being a student. I have to struggle with writing my proposal, working one on one with my advisors, and prepare my defense hopefully by next year, assuming life doesn’t get in the way. But it does and it will happen. It’s already happening to me now. But that is not going to stop me. No matter what….just keep going, tiger.
via Do Note http://ift.tt/2AjYFKV

Advertisements

Fourth Annual Asian Conference on Language Learning April 17-20 2014 in Osaka, references and graditude!

Hello all,

First I want to thank Steve Cornwell and all of the staff, guest speakers, and all the wonderful people I met at the Osaka ACLL/ACTC 2014! I look forward to next years event and I strongly recommend this conference in order to get a broader view of languge teaching practice and research across Asia!

Regarding my presentation,  if you would like references to the literature I mentioned please click here.

Also since there has been a lot of interest in what we do with our writing program… here is the pdf of my powerpoint. Enjoy!

In addition, there will be a video coming up soon on how to make an example-driven style of feedback for writing, so please stay tuned….

My students say the absolute minimum

This is great adivce to the language teacher! I certainly agree with everything here but I am a little weary of giving stickers unless it is given sparingly. My answer to the forth point is to tell jokes in class if you are the teacher, particulary jokes that involve both L1 and L2 words. It could help students remember certian vocabulary if it is presented in a pun. But don’t overdo it though. My colleauges can attest to this!

Oxford University Press

Solutions Speaking ChallengeZarina Subhan, an experienced teacher and teacher trainer, tackles the second of our Solutions Speaking Challenges: “My students say the absolute minimum”.

I find myself in the classroom in an unfamiliar position. It’s not the fact that I’ve given up teaching that makes this a new experience for me. It is the fact that I’m a student again. I’m learning Spanish and am sitting behind the desk, no longer the decision-maker who tells the learners what to do, but the student awaiting instructions and wondering if I understood them.

I’m rediscovering how uncertain, vulnerable and anxious it can feel to be a language student. Most of the reading, writing, listening, speaking and (most importantly) thinking in the target language (TL) happens in the classroom. I know I am there to improve my language; my motivation as an adult learner is high, yet I have to admit I could speak…

View original post 657 more words

QuizBean | Quickly Create Online Quizzes For Free

See on Scoop.itvocabulary learning

QuizBean is the easiest way to create and share online quizzes with your friends. It’s totally free, so what are you waiting for? Make your first quiz!

See on www.quizbean.com

MAJ: Best Moodle Innovation Award ベスト・ムードル・イノベーション賞について

See on Scoop.itComputer Aided Language Learning

Peter Parise‘s insight:

Planning to go to this conference. Hope to learn a lot since I am new to Moodle.

See on moodlejapan.org

9 Tools to Create E-magazines and Newspapers for Your Class

See on Scoop.itComputer Aided Language Learning

When I worked in a public school in Japan, I remember how the students would make the front page of a newspaper to tell about their school trip to Kyoto, or other events. Now your students can go from analog to digital.

I am pretty sure as you introduce the idea to your students everyone will want to have a say in their next e-magazine. There is nothing much more rewarding to students then to have a proof of their hard work recognized in a publication of some sort.

Most of the tools cited here are easy to use and have user-friendly interface and they will let you create your own e-magazine or newspaper in few simple steps. Yet I would recommend your discretion as you use them with your students.

See on www.educatorstechnology.com

TIME Magazine Corpus of American English

See on Scoop.itComputer Aided Language Learning

100+ million word corpus of American English, 1923-2006.

See on corpus.byu.edu

How Knowing a Foreign Language Can Improve Your Decisions: Scientific American

See on Scoop.itFluency development in Foreign Languages

Thinking in another language changes how people weigh their options…

After reading this it seems that:

You will think more logically in your foreign language rather than in your native one. The idea is that your native tounge will have more emotional resonance rather than your foreign one, which may influnce your decisions and act illogically.

One side that was not considered is the poficiency of the speakers L2. While my Japanese is ok, I wouldn’t be confident to make life-or -death decisions based on this. Maybe that is a logical decision.

See on www.scientificamerican.com

Flipping Bloom’s Taxonomy | Powerful Learning Practice

See on Scoop.itComputer Aided Language Learning

Many teachers in many classrooms spend the majority of their time in the basement of the taxonomy, never really addressing or developing the higher order thinking skills that kids need to develop. We end up with rote and boring classrooms. Rote and boring curriculum. Much of today’s standardized testing rigorously tests the basement, further anchoring the focus of learning at the bottom steps, which is not beneficial for our students.

See on plpnetwork.com

The Top 100 Language Learning Blogs Competition | Foreign …

See on Scoop.itComputer Aided Language Learning

Interesting post here, there is a top 100  Language Learning Blog Competition, and this is one of the nominees.

Foreign Language Education in the 21st Century has been nominated in in this year’s Lexophile/bab.la Top 100 Language Lovers 2012 competition again. Thank you, whovever is ‘responsible’ 🙂 for this. Please click on this …

See on juergenkurtz.wordpress.com