Category Archives: teaching

References for my presentation at the Temple University Applied Linguistic Colloquium 2015

The presentation went well, learned a lot and for those who saw please have a look here, presentation posting on the way!

http://tesolpeter.renshuishere.com/references-for-my-presentation-at-the-temple-university-applied-linguistics-colloquium-2015/

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Fourth Annual Asian Conference on Language Learning April 17-20 2014 in Osaka, references and graditude!

Hello all,

First I want to thank Steve Cornwell and all of the staff, guest speakers, and all the wonderful people I met at the Osaka ACLL/ACTC 2014! I look forward to next years event and I strongly recommend this conference in order to get a broader view of languge teaching practice and research across Asia!

Regarding my presentation,  if you would like references to the literature I mentioned please click here.

Also since there has been a lot of interest in what we do with our writing program… here is the pdf of my powerpoint. Enjoy!

In addition, there will be a video coming up soon on how to make an example-driven style of feedback for writing, so please stay tuned….

My students say the absolute minimum

This is great adivce to the language teacher! I certainly agree with everything here but I am a little weary of giving stickers unless it is given sparingly. My answer to the forth point is to tell jokes in class if you are the teacher, particulary jokes that involve both L1 and L2 words. It could help students remember certian vocabulary if it is presented in a pun. But don’t overdo it though. My colleauges can attest to this!

Oxford University Press

Solutions Speaking ChallengeZarina Subhan, an experienced teacher and teacher trainer, tackles the second of our Solutions Speaking Challenges: “My students say the absolute minimum”.

I find myself in the classroom in an unfamiliar position. It’s not the fact that I’ve given up teaching that makes this a new experience for me. It is the fact that I’m a student again. I’m learning Spanish and am sitting behind the desk, no longer the decision-maker who tells the learners what to do, but the student awaiting instructions and wondering if I understood them.

I’m rediscovering how uncertain, vulnerable and anxious it can feel to be a language student. Most of the reading, writing, listening, speaking and (most importantly) thinking in the target language (TL) happens in the classroom. I know I am there to improve my language; my motivation as an adult learner is high, yet I have to admit I could speak…

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How to get Copyright Free Images

An excellent blog that begins with the recent news about Getty Images allowing bloggers to embed their pictures without fear of litigation. This is cleverly used as a springboard to discuss the idea of the “fair use” of images, and the myths surrounding it. Also check out a list of sites which enable someone to find unrestricted or creative commons images. I appreciate this since I too use images not only for my work on the Internet, but also for teacher training. While we want to encourage language teachers to adopt images, it is important that they are aware of the issues surrounding the fair use of images. Thank you Teacher Phili, keep up the blogging!

Teacher Phili

Usain Bolt - Photo: Alexander Hassenstein / Getty Images Usain Bolt – Photo: Alexander Hassenstein / Getty Images

Following the news that Getty Images have just taken the decision to allow images (1) on its site available for bloggers to use for free, I thought it would be timely to look at the issue of digital image copyright on the Internet and where you can find copyright free photos and images that you can use to illustrate your blog or other online material which can be seen by anyone.

It’s a massive change of direction from the company, which had previously developed a reputation for being litigious about unlicensed use of its photography, suing small organisations for infringement.  Getty has not been able to stop people using and redistributing its images without permission, so it is adopting a more pragmatic approach to the question of how to make money from its images.

Using Getty’s new embed feature, bloggers can…

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References for poster presentation at The International Symposium on Innovative Teaching and Research in ESP at at the University of Electro Communications, Tokyo・電気通信大学,東京

For those who went to this wonderful symposium last weekend

The references I have in my poster can be found here.

I want to thank UEC, and Professor Shi Jie for holding this event, and I look forward to more in the future.

INTERNATIONAL ESP SYMPOSIUM UEC TOKYO 2014-02-14 23-55-00

ESP Sympoisum poster

Poster presentation at The International Symposium on Innovative Teaching and Research in ESP at at the University of Electro Communications, Tokyo・電気通信大学,東京

INTERNATIONAL ESP SYMPOSIUM UEC TOKYO 2014-02-14 23-55-00ESP Sympoisum poster

Greetings fellow teachers, researchers and everyone on the Internet!

I am presenting a poster about my work with in-service Japanese teachers of English for junior and senior high schools at The International Symposium on Innovative Teaching and Research in ESP at the University of Electro Communications, Tokyo, on February 22, 2014. This time the focus will be on a writing workshop at our institution that we offer online using Moodle.

What makes this moodle writing course unique is the fact that we provide three types of feedback:direct, audio and data-driven.

The focus in particular will be on the data-driven part of the workshop and how the participants feel about encountering this type of feedback.

This poster is also a chance for me to engage with other corpus and data-driven learning specialists in the field and get some ideas on how to approach this course with a research agenda, especially one focused on obtaining quantitative, as well as qualitative data.

It is not that I am biased toward qualitative research, but most CALL and data-driven, corpus research has been primarily this way for a long time now. (Chambers 2007, Boulton 2008) and so the demand is high for this type of approach.

The symposium will also host a variety of speakers, Stefan Gries (UCSB, USA),
Winnie Cheng (Hong Kong Polytechnic University, China)Laurence Anthony (Waseda University, Japan), Theron Muller (Toyama University, Japan). Just to meet and talk with anyof these specialists of the field would be a very speciai opportunity indeed.

I also want to thank Shi Jie (Universityof Electro-Communications, Japan) for setting up this symposium. Much appreciation and thanks in advance for her hard work.

If you plan to be at the symposium, please feel free to find my poster.  According to the schedule the poster session goes from 2-3:30, so have a chat with me if you are around.

See you there,

Oh p.s.♥ Happy Valentines Day! ♥

********

References

Boulton, A. (2008). Evaluating corpus use in language learning: State of play and future directions. Paper presented at the Amerian Accociation of Corpus Linguisitcs, Brighham Young University.

Chambers, A. (2007). Popularising corpus consultation by language learners and teachers. In E. Hidalgo Tenorio, L. Rodríguez-Navarro, J. Santana (Eds.). Corpora in the Foreign Language Classroom: Selected papers from the Sixth International Conference on Teaching and Language Corpora (TaLC 6). (pp. 3-16). Kenilworth: Rodopi.

Presentation at JALT 2013 in Kobe!

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Hello all,

Just wanted to add that coming up this month I and my colleauges of the English teacher training division for the Kanagawa Institute of Language and Culture Studies (神奈川県国際言語文化アカデミアの外国語にかかる教員研修事業.  will be giving a forum on our Advanced Leader Teacher program at this coming JALT conference at the Kobe Convention Center, Portopia, Kobe, Hyogo, Japan October 25th – 28th, 2013

The title of the presentation: A Voyage of Reflective Teaching

The Advanced program gathers 20 English teachers who teach in high schools in Kanagawa, supporting them in action research and professional development in order to create “leader teachers” who will be the hub of change and professional development in their schools.

This program has entered its third year and we will present the changes we have noticed in our participants and the process in promoting that change.

Our presentation will be on Monday October 28th, 10:10-11:40 in room 407 at the convention.

For more information:

The presentation abstract:http://jalt.org/2013/abstract.php?p=71

Jalt2013 information (in English and Japanese) http://jalt.org/conference

Our institute (in Japanese) :http://www.pref.kanagawa.jp/cnt/f7807/

Our program (in Japanese) http://www.pref.kanagawa.jp/cnt/f440038/

(in English) http://group14teachers.renshuishere.com/

We continue to use technology to reinforce 19th century teaching practice’

See on Scoop.itComputer Aided Language Learning

why [has] technology, to date, had very little impact on improved learning outcomes? This could be because we continue to use technology to reinforce 19th century teaching practice to meet out-dated assessment models. Most of the world’s curriculum and assessment systems are based around fact recall rather than actually demonstrating that you have learned something and can deploy it within a problem-solving situation.

See on www.wise-qatar.org

子ども中心ではじめる英語レッスン・Teaching English to Children in Asia

子ども中心ではじめる英語レッスン・Teaching English to Children in Asia

Cover of English Version

I think if there was ever a more influential book out there for teaching EFL in Asia this text written by David Paul is the one. It is my personal favorite.

In the early days of my teaching career when I was fresh and in need of some guidance, this book lead the way for me especially when I had to teach younger children. The best part about it is the philosophy: child-centered learning over teacher-centered learning. Is the ideal teaching situation one where the students are told what to learn or is it discovered on their own in the right conditions? How do we deliver content and at the same time encourage our students to “discover” English and not be too dependent on the teacher at the same time?

This text, along with others, will be based on a workshop I will teach at the Kanagawa Institute of Language and Culture in the Summer of 2014. One will focus on the elementary school context.  I hope I can shed light on some of these questions in my workshop. The focus will also be on how to conduct cooperative language learning as well.

If you click the link you can find a copy but strangely the Japanese translation of this text is out of print, which makes me wonder how it was received in Japan.

A Calm Teacher Makes a Calm Classroom

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5 Ways to be a Calmer More Effective Teacher by Michael Linsin

Five, all you need is five bits of advice to have to teach students in a calm, collected manner. Interesting advice is here for teaching language, and for teachers in general.