Category Archives: Vocabulary

A Wordle of this blog!

4 weeks 1 day ago…

Wordle: The top 50 words of my blog

4 months ago….

Wordle: tesol_peter.wordpress.com

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Lextutor video by Tom Cobb!

http://wp.me/PfNDY-bA

For those who want a video tour of the site by the creator himself. Look no further. Enjoy and learn!

Are flashcards effective? フラッシュカードで語彙を覚えるかどうか


Via: Voxy Blog

TIME Magazine Corpus of American English

See on Scoop.itComputer Aided Language Learning

100+ million word corpus of American English, 1923-2006.

See on corpus.byu.edu

Memory Enhanced by a Simple Break After Reading — PsyBlog

See on Scoop.itvocabulary learning

I wonder how often we give our students a chance to consolidate what they learn, especially when it comes to vocabulary etc.

If you find it difficult to remember what you’ve read, try this easy technique.

See on www.spring.org.uk

Michael Stout’s Blog-For students and teachers: Vocabulary Flashcards

See on Scoop.itvocabulary learning

Michael Stouts online resource for his own students using a flaschard app. Perfect example of a teacher using blogging for delivering class material.

See on mrstoutsblog.blogspot.fr

I Hope That “Hopefully” Isn’t Misused

See on Scoop.itvocabulary learning

This is something I tend to overuse myself. It seems that in order for a language to evolve, some grammatical rules must be “transgressed”. With this example here, it may be an issue of formality vs informality.

 

“I hope” in more formal documents and “Hopefully” in less formal? This is pure guesswork on my part.

 

Example No. 4,335,081 of how the English language confounds as it evolves, and the evolution doesn’t necessarily make it better: hopefully. It is an adverb defined as “in a hopeful mann…

See on usingtherightwords.wordpress.com

How Knowing a Foreign Language Can Improve Your Decisions: Scientific American

See on Scoop.itFluency development in Foreign Languages

Thinking in another language changes how people weigh their options…

After reading this it seems that:

You will think more logically in your foreign language rather than in your native one. The idea is that your native tounge will have more emotional resonance rather than your foreign one, which may influnce your decisions and act illogically.

One side that was not considered is the poficiency of the speakers L2. While my Japanese is ok, I wouldn’t be confident to make life-or -death decisions based on this. Maybe that is a logical decision.

See on www.scientificamerican.com

Confusion Helps Us Learn: Scientific American Podcast

See on Scoop.itComputer Aided Language Learning

Really interesting article that challenges our assumptions about learning.

See on www.scientificamerican.com