Tag Archives: Interesting

Don’t Believe Anyone Who Tells You Learning To Code Is Easy

This is just what I needed to read. A level headed approach to learning to code. Yes I have felt the fustration, the bordom, the perplexity of learning code. I really appreciate this post becasue Ray understands the process, and the coders’ secret (surfing google till you find the code, then copy and paste, which I too am quite guilty of but enjoy none the less.)
Also the best advice: follow the tutortial. This too is something I need to adopt becasue one book of Java I was reading was to write code for a determining the sale price of an item, which to me was understandable, but quite boring in terms of content. It was not enticing enough for me to write as a program. Probably the best thing to do is either find a more enaging tutorial or like Ray suggests, just go though the motions even though you don’t understand it. Sometimes the process, once completed, provides insights that would never have occured if you avoid the process.
Anyway click the link and read on….
Thank you Kate Ray for the suggestions, and the mental support!

My students say the absolute minimum

This is great adivce to the language teacher! I certainly agree with everything here but I am a little weary of giving stickers unless it is given sparingly. My answer to the forth point is to tell jokes in class if you are the teacher, particulary jokes that involve both L1 and L2 words. It could help students remember certian vocabulary if it is presented in a pun. But don’t overdo it though. My colleauges can attest to this!

Oxford University Press

Solutions Speaking ChallengeZarina Subhan, an experienced teacher and teacher trainer, tackles the second of our Solutions Speaking Challenges: “My students say the absolute minimum”.

I find myself in the classroom in an unfamiliar position. It’s not the fact that I’ve given up teaching that makes this a new experience for me. It is the fact that I’m a student again. I’m learning Spanish and am sitting behind the desk, no longer the decision-maker who tells the learners what to do, but the student awaiting instructions and wondering if I understood them.

I’m rediscovering how uncertain, vulnerable and anxious it can feel to be a language student. Most of the reading, writing, listening, speaking and (most importantly) thinking in the target language (TL) happens in the classroom. I know I am there to improve my language; my motivation as an adult learner is high, yet I have to admit I could speak…

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Are flashcards effective? フラッシュカードで語彙を覚えるかどうか


Via: Voxy Blog

Common Writing Mistakes

See on Scoop.itComputer Aided Language Learning

English is full of traps, even for native speakers. Fall into one of them, and most people won’t notice or care if it is spoken English. In writing though, especially when you sit for exams, things are more complicated.

See on www.teachers-corner.co.uk

MAJ: Best Moodle Innovation Award ベスト・ムードル・イノベーション賞について

See on Scoop.itComputer Aided Language Learning

Peter Parise‘s insight:

Planning to go to this conference. Hope to learn a lot since I am new to Moodle.

See on moodlejapan.org

A Calm Teacher Makes a Calm Classroom

keep-calm-i-m-an-english-teacher-2

5 Ways to be a Calmer More Effective Teacher by Michael Linsin

Five, all you need is five bits of advice to have to teach students in a calm, collected manner. Interesting advice is here for teaching language, and for teachers in general.

A lovely blog

Hello everybody,
A fellow blogger Chelsea Brown sent me this award a while back, and since I was taken by this simple gesture, I figured I would pass this along. I know it took me a while to get this together, but here it is.

Now according to these rules, I need to describe seven things about myself.
Well, here we go,

  1. I live in Japan.
  2. I love my son, and he is the most precious thing in my life right now.
  3. I teach people, and people teach me. It`s not an easy job, but I think this is a choice that I feel good about. Of all the occupations I considered, this one can let me sleep at night.
  4. I teach English and at the moment I am training teachers in Japan on how to be better English teachers for their students, schools, communities.
  5. I am an artist, and I try to approach the challenges, and problems in my work and life in an intuitive manner.
  6. Also I am a researcher in applied linguistics and corpus linguistics. The concept of data driven learning is very appealing but also very challenging to apply in the classroom.
  7. The one quote that I live by: “In the beginner`s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert`s mind there are few”- Shunryu Suzuki.

Now my five favorite blogs:

1   corp. ling.stats|Statistics for corpus linguistics= If you want to learn how to use stats this blogger is quite thorough.

http://www3.nufs.ac.jp/~yoshi/teaching.html

2  One page I really enjoy is on Scoop it. and that is by a fellow colleague Marcel at the Kanagawa Institute called Internet Resources for Paper Based EFL which functions as a site for teachers to access tools for creating worksheets, games and other time-saving tips for the language teacher.

Internet Resources for Paper Based EFL

3 Another WordPress page which is devoted to 21st century applications for learning with a particular focus on young learners is

IGameMom.com 

4 If you are interested in criminal justice, CrimeDime is the source. I haven`t seen many posts lately but I hope to read more soon. The info you read about crime, law enforcement, and the prison industrial system in the US, this can be quite an eye opener.

http://crimedime.com/about/

5 And finally I have to give some Linux love to A Psycho Path who writes some excellent advice for those who use Ubuntu like myself. Check out this when you have a chance.

http://sosaysharis.wordpress.com/

So according to the rules those of you who I mentioned try to pass the favor by talking about yourself, and choosing 5 of your favorite blogs. I know we are all (myself included) busy so no pressure here.

Thank you Chelsea for awarding me with this and for everyone`s support.

9 Tools to Create E-magazines and Newspapers for Your Class

See on Scoop.itComputer Aided Language Learning

When I worked in a public school in Japan, I remember how the students would make the front page of a newspaper to tell about their school trip to Kyoto, or other events. Now your students can go from analog to digital.

I am pretty sure as you introduce the idea to your students everyone will want to have a say in their next e-magazine. There is nothing much more rewarding to students then to have a proof of their hard work recognized in a publication of some sort.

Most of the tools cited here are easy to use and have user-friendly interface and they will let you create your own e-magazine or newspaper in few simple steps. Yet I would recommend your discretion as you use them with your students.

See on www.educatorstechnology.com

TIME Magazine Corpus of American English

See on Scoop.itComputer Aided Language Learning

100+ million word corpus of American English, 1923-2006.

See on corpus.byu.edu

Bigger, Better Google Ngrams: Brace Yourself for the Power of Grammar – The Atlantic

See on Scoop.itComputer Aided Language Learning

The power of web based corpus research has become even more accessable thanks to Google Ngrams. Its funny how Zimmer writes about how this tool can suck time: meaning that anyone using it may spend hours trying different combinations and comparisons. Good!

“Bigger, Better Google Ngrams: Brace Yourself for the Power of GrammarThe AtlanticBack in December 2010, Google unveiled an online tool for analyzing the history of language and culture as reflected in the gargantuan corpus of historical texts that…

See on www.theatlantic.com