Tag Archives: research

Don’t Go Down the Google Books Garden Path

Interesting post here about the Google Ngram viewer and its limitations. One possible limitation about this viewer is if the amount of literature for each time period included are normalized, in other words are all the texts in Google Books represented in equal amount, or would it be possible that there are more texts from the 20th century and after compared to before? Since the data for all this comes from Google books itself, is it just a raw reading of the data, or are the years normalized? I have only casually looked into this tool, so I don’t know if this is true or not. If anybody knows the Google NGram viewer well or uses it on a regular basis, feel free to comment.

...And Read All Over

When Google?s Ngram Viewer was the topic of a post on Science-Based Medice, I knew it was becoming mainstream. No longer happy to only be toyed with by linguists killing time, the Ngram Viewer had entranced people from other walks of life. And I can understand why. Google?s Ngram Viewer is an impressive service that allows you to quickly and easily search for the frequency of words and phrases in millions of books. But I want to warn you about Google?s Ngram Viewer. As a corpus linguist, I think it?s important to explain just what Ngram Viewer is, what it can be used to do, how I feel about it, and the praise it has been receiving since its inception. I?ll start out simple: despite all its power and what it seems to be capable of, looks can be deceiving.

Have we learned nothing?

Jann Bellamy wrote a post

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Corpora Info Page

See on Scoop.itComputer Aided Language Learning

Corpora- Text Corpora list.

A listserve for conferences, publications, programs, recent corpora, and other resources.

See on gandalf.aksis.uib.no

Many Eyes

See on Scoop.itComputer Aided Language Learning

Data visualization site by IBM open for public use. Ideal for presentations, discussions, poster sessions, and other classroom activities. For language learning, click “Visualization types” and look at “Analyze a text” for word clouds and word trees etc.

 

Enjoy!

See on www-958.ibm.com

Need help with a Literature review? Follow seven steps!

http://www.librarydevelopment.group.shef.ac.uk/showcase/tutorials/lit_review/intro.html Image

Literature reviews can be a complex process, and with the plethora of data out there to consume, (journals, books, the Internet) the University Of Sheffield posted this handy guide for those who need a little more structure to their research. To see the whole tutorial, click here or the image.

If you want to look at another way to approach a literature review, look at this

Wordle! A Colorful Way to Present Word Frequencies

Wordle: High Fequency Words in Oral Communication Textbook

Wordle: High Frequency Words In Oral Communication Textbook_with Fucntion Words

I found one interesting website which uses word frequencies to create word clouds, that is http://www.wordle.net created by Johnathan Feinberg. I created these clouds from one of my high school’s Oral Communication textbook and made a giant print for that schools faculty art exhibition. This seems like a more visually pleasing way to present word frequencies to students in contrast with ranked frequency lists.  I am curious about how other teachers would use this material in their classrooms.

If you go to the site, you have the option of uploading a text and creating a composition. Also you can also use links to get material directly from the internet, and you can also gather tags from a del.ici.ous user. Give it a try and see for yourself.