Tag Archives: TESOL

Workshop on Micro-skills at the JALT 2014 Conference in Tsukuba, Japan

Hello everyone,
The In-Service Teacher Training Division of the Kanagawa Institute of Language and Culture is offering a workshop at this year’s Japan Association of Language Teachers International Conference at the Tsukuba International Congress Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.

Sun, Nov 23, 2:10 PM – 3:10 PM; Rm 405 B

  • Context: Junior/Senior High School
  • Content area: Teacher Education (TED)
  • Format: Workshop
  • Language: English and Japanese

The focus of this workshop is on micro-skills for teacher training and how it can help teachers of English prepare to meet the standards of educational policy in Japan.

In contrast to conventional teacher training, which consists mostly of lectures on teaching methodology we offer an alternative which starts with the idea that teaching is a “performance based” profession. To do this, the teacher needs to practice specific classroom related skills in the company of peers who can offer feedback.

 For an abstract and other information, please click the link.

http://jalt.org/2014/abstract.php?p=202

If you are at the conference please be sure to attend. Also this year each listing on the website allows comments so if you can support even online that would be a great help.
See you there,
Peter
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Data visualization discovery: potential for classroom/ CALL use!

Data visualization discovery: potential for classroom/ CALL use!

Work and employment is one topic of discussion. But one way to present the topic in a CALL environment would be to have students use this handy post I discovered on  the BBC news site comparing work hours. One idea here would be to have students enter the number of days they work if they have a job, or if they don’t work they could enter the data of someone they know (parent, friend, etc.) or maybe their “ideal” work hours.  Then they could talk about their work situation, make comparisons with other countries and/or other students situations. You can also access the related article about Who gets the most time off? for more discussion material.

I recommend giving this a try yourself!

But would this be appropriate in some cultures to talk about their occupation with others? For North Americans is fine but for other countries it might be taboo. What do you think?

Presentation in Ibaraki!

I will be giving a presentation on techniques to improve spoken fluency with Anne Takata on February 19, 2012 for the Ibaraki JALT chapter in Japan. For more information here is the link to the Ibaraki JALT. Hope to see you there.

Date: February 19th
Time: 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Room no: Sho-kouzashitsu #2 (Small-sized Room #2)
Place: Ibaraki Kennan Gakushu Center (in Urara Building, 5th Floor)
2:40 – 4:00 (1 hour to talk and 20 for QA)

Peter Parise and Anne Takata

Abstract

Fluency? Fluency. Fluency!: Practical and theoretical approaches to fluency development.

Armed with a firm background in grammar and lexis, Japanese EFL students are well primed for fluency development. This presentation will demonstrate a simple and effective fluency activity that is suitable for a wide range of levels and class contexts. Both theoretical and practical uses will be discussed.

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For a PDF of the power point  and reference list go here

日本語の抄録ここにクリック

Workshop at JALT CALL 2010, and you can join the fun too!

Hello everybody,

Just wanted to give you notice that I will be giving a workshop at the JALT CALL 2010. (Thats the Japan Association of Language Teachers Computer Assisted Language Learning conference in case you don’t live in Japan)

The title of this workshop is devoted to one internet tool Wordle, created by Johnathan Feinberg.   I am offering this here make teachers in Japan aware of its potential. We will create some word clouds in the lab and group brainstorm ideas on applying them in the classroom.

You too can witness the action because I am presenting this via Google Docs Presentation software, which can allow users to see the presentation online!

here is the link to the presentation.

I will be giving this on Sunday, May 30th at from 9:30 am to 11 am Japan time.  I look forward to your participation.

Poster Presentation at JALT-CALL

I will be giving a poster presentation at the Jalt-Call conference at Toyo Gakuen- Hongo Campus, Tokyo Japan . My poster will be on June 7th 10:30 am to 12:00 pm in room 4503

The title of this poster is:

In Just One Year: An Electronic Corpus of Junior High Learners for Vocabulary Learning and Teaching

here is the link to the event.

http://jaltcall.org/content/course/view.php?id=16

and a link to the presenters where you can read my abstract.

http://jaltcall.org/content/mod/resource/view.php?id=375

Also of note about my is the fact there will be a “high frequency word list raffle” in which conference attendees can guess the top five most frequent words for a writing assignment executed by Japanese junior high students. I think activities like this would be a stimulating way to encourage such students to think about how they use their productive vocabulary in writing. If you try this with your students, please let me know your results.

See you at the conference.

Regarding Corpus building.

  I think the toughest thing about building a corpus is the fact that if you are working alone, you are the only one who has to input the data. Actually this stage takes the most time for what I want to do.

For the project that I presented at the Temple University Japan Colloquium 2009

, the whole process involves entering data by hand, typing each essay one by one. Luckily junior high L2 writing is short, so what I do to alleviate having to type a lot of text is to look for any consistent phrases that can be seen in the essays and write them on a separate word document. Then I hit Ctrl+C(hitting C twice) to open the clipboard and save the common phrases. I think this depends on the similarity of texts. When I have to enter any new essays, I lay down the copied texts with the annotation information. Then I either add or subtract phrases according to what was written. This way the labor of inputting data is relieved somewhat and my arms can take a break.

If anyone knows of a better way to do this than the above method on Word or maybe Excel, I would be happy to hear from you.