Fourth Annual Asian Conference on Language Learning April 17-20 2014 in Osaka, references and graditude!

Hello all,

First I want to thank Steve Cornwell and all of the staff, guest speakers, and all the wonderful people I met at the Osaka ACLL/ACTC 2014! I look forward to next years event and I strongly recommend this conference in order to get a broader view of languge teaching practice and research across Asia!

Regarding my presentation,  if you would like references to the literature I mentioned please click here.

Also since there has been a lot of interest in what we do with our writing program… here is the pdf of my powerpoint. Enjoy!

In addition, there will be a video coming up soon on how to make an example-driven style of feedback for writing, so please stay tuned….

My students say the absolute minimum

Parise Peter:

This is great adivce to the language teacher! I certainly agree with everything here but I am a little weary of giving stickers unless it is given sparingly. My answer to the forth point is to tell jokes in class if you are the teacher, particulary jokes that involve both L1 and L2 words. It could help students remember certian vocabulary if it is presented in a pun. But don’t overdo it though. My colleauges can attest to this!

Originally posted on Oxford University Press:

Solutions Speaking ChallengeZarina Subhan, an experienced teacher and teacher trainer, tackles the second of our Solutions Speaking Challenges: “My students say the absolute minimum”.

I find myself in the classroom in an unfamiliar position. It’s not the fact that I’ve given up teaching that makes this a new experience for me. It is the fact that I’m a student again. I’m learning Spanish and am sitting behind the desk, no longer the decision-maker who tells the learners what to do, but the student awaiting instructions and wondering if I understood them.

I’m rediscovering how uncertain, vulnerable and anxious it can feel to be a language student. Most of the reading, writing, listening, speaking and (most importantly) thinking in the target language (TL) happens in the classroom. I know I am there to improve my language; my motivation as an adult learner is high, yet I have to admit I could speak…

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How to get Copyright Free Images

Parise Peter:

An excellent blog that begins with the recent news about Getty Images allowing bloggers to embed their pictures without fear of litigation. This is cleverly used as a springboard to discuss the idea of the “fair use” of images, and the myths surrounding it. Also check out a list of sites which enable someone to find unrestricted or creative commons images. I appreciate this since I too use images not only for my work on the Internet, but also for teacher training. While we want to encourage language teachers to adopt images, it is important that they are aware of the issues surrounding the fair use of images. Thank you Teacher Phili, keep up the blogging!

Originally posted on Teacher Phili:

Usain Bolt - Photo: Alexander Hassenstein / Getty Images
Usain Bolt – Photo: Alexander Hassenstein / Getty Images

Following the news that Getty Images have just taken the decision to allow images (1) on its site available for bloggers to use for free, I thought it would be timely to look at the issue of digital image copyright on the Internet and where you can find copyright free photos and images that you can use to illustrate your blog or other online material which can be seen by anyone.

It’s a massive change of direction from the company, which had previously developed a reputation for being litigious about unlicensed use of its photography, suing small organisations for infringement.  Getty has not been able to stop people using and redistributing its images without permission, so it is adopting a more pragmatic approach to the question of how to make money from its images.

Using Getty’s new embed feature, bloggers can…

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Ch..ch..ch..ch..changes!

It was time.  A time for a change…..of theme.  One thing that struck me was the fact that the previous WordPress theme  I used was not so kind to mobile devices,  at least when I looked at the mobile view my theme Ambiru had offered.

The downside is that my pictures are now grainy, so gotta get a new image up sometime. So stay tuned.

The moral of this story: be kind to the smartphone user, they are the future!

References for poster presentation at The International Symposium on Innovative Teaching and Research in ESP at at the University of Electro Communications, Tokyo・電気通信大学,東京

For those who went to this wonderful symposium last weekend

The references I have in my poster can be found here.

I want to thank UEC, and Professor Shi Jie for holding this event, and I look forward to more in the future.

INTERNATIONAL ESP SYMPOSIUM UEC TOKYO 2014-02-14 23-55-00

ESP Sympoisum poster

Poster presentation at The International Symposium on Innovative Teaching and Research in ESP at at the University of Electro Communications, Tokyo・電気通信大学,東京

INTERNATIONAL ESP SYMPOSIUM UEC TOKYO 2014-02-14 23-55-00ESP Sympoisum poster

Greetings fellow teachers, researchers and everyone on the Internet!

I am presenting a poster about my work with in-service Japanese teachers of English for junior and senior high schools at The International Symposium on Innovative Teaching and Research in ESP at the University of Electro Communications, Tokyo, on February 22, 2014. This time the focus will be on a writing workshop at our institution that we offer online using Moodle.

What makes this moodle writing course unique is the fact that we provide three types of feedback:direct, audio and data-driven.

The focus in particular will be on the data-driven part of the workshop and how the participants feel about encountering this type of feedback.

This poster is also a chance for me to engage with other corpus and data-driven learning specialists in the field and get some ideas on how to approach this course with a research agenda, especially one focused on obtaining quantitative, as well as qualitative data.

It is not that I am biased toward qualitative research, but most CALL and data-driven, corpus research has been primarily this way for a long time now. (Chambers 2007, Boulton 2008) and so the demand is high for this type of approach.

The symposium will also host a variety of speakers, Stefan Gries (UCSB, USA),
Winnie Cheng (Hong Kong Polytechnic University, China)Laurence Anthony (Waseda University, Japan), Theron Muller (Toyama University, Japan). Just to meet and talk with anyof these specialists of the field would be a very speciai opportunity indeed.

I also want to thank Shi Jie (Universityof Electro-Communications, Japan) for setting up this symposium. Much appreciation and thanks in advance for her hard work.

If you plan to be at the symposium, please feel free to find my poster.  According to the schedule the poster session goes from 2-3:30, so have a chat with me if you are around.

See you there,

Oh p.s.♥ Happy Valentines Day! ♥

********

References

Boulton, A. (2008). Evaluating corpus use in language learning: State of play and future directions. Paper presented at the Amerian Accociation of Corpus Linguisitcs, Brighham Young University.

Chambers, A. (2007). Popularising corpus consultation by language learners and teachers. In E. Hidalgo Tenorio, L. Rodríguez-Navarro, J. Santana (Eds.). Corpora in the Foreign Language Classroom: Selected papers from the Sixth International Conference on Teaching and Language Corpora (TaLC 6). (pp. 3-16). Kenilworth: Rodopi.

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Don’t Go Down the Google Books Garden Path

Parise Peter:

Interesting post here about the Google Ngram viewer and its limitations. One possible limitation about this viewer is if the amount of literature for each time period included are normalized, in other words are all the texts in Google Books represented in equal amount, or would it be possible that there are more texts from the 20th century and after compared to before? Since the data for all this comes from Google books itself, is it just a raw reading of the data, or are the years normalized? I have only casually looked into this tool, so I don’t know if this is true or not. If anybody knows the Google NGram viewer well or uses it on a regular basis, feel free to comment.

Originally posted on ...And Read All Over:

When Google?s Ngram Viewer was the topic of a post on Science-Based Medice , I knew it was becoming mainstream. No longer happy to only be toyed with by linguists killing time, the Ngram Viewer had entranced people from other walks of life. And I can understand why. Google?s Ngram Viewer is an impressive service that allows you to quickly and easily search for the frequency of words and phrases in millions of books. But I want to warn you about Google?s Ngram Viewer. As a corpus linguist, I think it?s important to explain just what Ngram Viewer is, what it can be used to do, how I feel about it, and the praise it has been receiving since its inception. I?ll start out simple: despite all its power and what it seems to be capable of, looks can be deceiving.

Have we learned nothing?

Jann Bellamy wrote a post

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A History of Computerised Corpus Tools on TimeMapper by muranava

Go here for more……

http://tesolpeter.wordpress.com/the-history-of-computerized-corpus-tools-by-muranava/?preview=true&preview_id=766&preview_nonce=11c6374717

QuizBean | Quickly Create Online Quizzes For Free

See on Scoop.itvocabulary learning

QuizBean is the easiest way to create and share online quizzes with your friends. It’s totally free, so what are you waiting for? Make your first quiz!

See on www.quizbean.com

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