July 27, 2016 at 07:40AM

Long time no see,

I has been a while. Blogging is something I have neglected lately and it is not so easy to seemlessly integrate my work as a teacher trainer, my Ph.D coursework, and my personal life into the mix. If anyone has the ultimate formula for doing this please comment below.

Most of the time I have used this blog to document my presentations at conferences here in Japan, which is fine for now. The one major personal and professional paradigm shift for me is deciding to get a Ph.D at Temple University. Not an easy decision to make, but after almost two years of coursework I have come to apprecite the wealth of information and community that has come with it. But this is only the beginning, which means clarifying a research agenda, dissertaion proposal, writing, and the defence. How does one keep going? One piece of advice I got is passion. Without passion for something that genuinely interests you, there can be no moving forward. I couldn’t agree more with this.
I will keep you posted on how far passion has taken me.
via Do Note http://ift.tt/2afeFBv

Reflections on my presentation at the Temple University Japan Applied Linguistics Colloquium 2016

Today another TUJ Colloquium is behind us…

I want to say thank you for attending my talk this afternoon. I greatly appreciate your support, and the feedback I received afterward, reminding me of what Mischler (1990) said: research is a craft. The beauty of the colloquium is the supportive atmosphere it provides to hone our craft.

The talk I gave today is titled Think Aloud vs. Stimulus Recall: Obtaining Responses to Writing Feedback in which I discussed my use of two different protocols for interviewing my learners in my blended writing  Continue reading..

Presenting at JALT 2015!!!!

It’s been a busy year for me and so please forgive me for being a stranger for this blogsite.

Anyway, I will be involved with two presentations at JALT this year. If you are in the neighborhood ( Shizuoka, Japan) be sure to check them out.

Teachers as Learners: Challenges for Training

Teacher Beliefs About Student Group and Pair Work

 

 

英文ライティング添削講座-Support Writing Course for 2015

Group 1 for Kanagawa Teachers

英文ライティング添削講座

Support Writing Course for 2015

at 神奈川県立国際言語文化アカデミア

A new academic year is here and now is a good time to practice writing.

So If you, or someone you know who is a junior high or high school English teacher in Kanagawa and is interested in working on their writing in English, please check this link for more details.

英文ライティング添削講座

http://www.pref.kanagawa.jp/cnt/f440038/p899374.html

5月28日- 7月23日
9月17日-12月9日

Thank you and we look forward to studying with you.

宜しくお願い致します。

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Keywords List – AntConc

A nice explanation of AntConc and its Keyword list function by Warren Tang.
I started using AntConc again for some qualitative research and discovered this while searching for advice. Thanks Warren for posting!

Warren M Tang

The keywords list in AntConc is, as the name suggests, a tool to create a list of keywords. To do this your target corpus is compared to a reference corpus. The target and reference corpora do not need to be of the same size. The comparison is then done statistically. The statistics in AntConc used for this task are either chi-squared and log-likelihood.

In AntConc load your corpus or corpora. Go to Wordlist tab then click start.

make wordlist

Select the Tools Preference menu.

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References for my presentation at the Temple University Applied Linguistic Colloquium 2015

The presentation went well, learned a lot and for those who saw please have a look here, presentation posting on the way!

http://tesolpeter.renshuishere.com/references-for-my-presentation-at-the-temple-university-applied-linguistics-colloquium-2015/

吉田研作先生公開講座ー3月21日ー神奈川県立国際言語文化アカデミア

吉田研作先生のご講演は、私たちが英語教育の状況をより深く理解し、今後の方向性を見いだすための多くの示唆を与えてくれます。アカデミアホームページからぜひお申し込みください。
http://www.pref.kanagawa.jp/cnt/f7807/
Yoshida Kensaku is a very thought provoking, engaging researcher. Speaking from my own experience, after every lecture I have seen by him, I have a deeper understanding of English education in Japan. If you have a chance to hear him speak on March 21st by all means please attend. To register either fax the pdf or register at the Academia’s main site. http://www.pref.kanagawa.jp/cnt/f7807/

Group 1 for Kanagawa Teachers

2015-01-29_0927

【定員】100人 定員を超えた場合は抽選。【受 講 料】無料
【申込期限】平成27年3月16日(月曜日)(必着)
事前のお申込みが必要ですが、抽選になり、ご受講ができなくなった
場合以外は特にこちらからの連絡はいたしませんので、当日、開講の
5分前までに当所においでください。(開場は9時30分です。)

申し込みダウンロードするためクリック

ロゴ2

吉田研作公開講座申し込み

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Personalised corpora for your students

A post about the value personalized selection for a pedagogical corpus.

TEFLtastic blog

Perhaps the biggest problem with corpora is the fact that none of them are more than an approximation of the English that individual students will come across and/ or need. In fact, as I said in my last post, I think in many cases it is such a big problem that it leads to results that are worse than teachers and materials writers just taking an intelligent guess at what language to base classroom materials on. This post seeks to show one way in which both of those ends of that materials development spectrum could come together, improving both along the way.

The basic idea is to base materials and classes on the English that students are themselves most likely to come across. For most people outside English-speaking countries, I believe that these are probably the most useful sources and kinds of language:

  1. English words used in their language (abbreviations…

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Workshop on Micro-skills at the JALT 2014 Conference in Tsukuba, Japan

Hello everyone,
The In-Service Teacher Training Division of the Kanagawa Institute of Language and Culture is offering a workshop at this year’s Japan Association of Language Teachers International Conference at the Tsukuba International Congress Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.

Sun, Nov 23, 2:10 PM – 3:10 PM; Rm 405 B

  • Context: Junior/Senior High School
  • Content area: Teacher Education (TED)
  • Format: Workshop
  • Language: English and Japanese

The focus of this workshop is on micro-skills for teacher training and how it can help teachers of English prepare to meet the standards of educational policy in Japan.

In contrast to conventional teacher training, which consists mostly of lectures on teaching methodology we offer an alternative which starts with the idea that teaching is a “performance based” profession. To do this, the teacher needs to practice specific classroom related skills in the company of peers who can offer feedback.

 For an abstract and other information, please click the link.

http://jalt.org/2014/abstract.php?p=202

If you are at the conference please be sure to attend. Also this year each listing on the website allows comments so if you can support even online that would be a great help.
See you there,
Peter

#IATEFL – This house believes that Primary ELT does more harm than good

I think Professor Hall is accurate with his description of the situation of non-immersion countries, like Japan where I currently live and teach. The policy on primary school English education here seems to be going in the right direction, yet what needs be done is to provide adequate support for teachers and schools in order to make a successful transition.
In terms of the debate though, I think primary ELT does not do any harm. Teachers even here in Japan notice a difference in the attitudes students have for English which did not exist years ago. The change is a change of affect, in that they feel more ready for English in middle school now due to their exposure in primary school. This makes a big difference in my opinion.

Oxford University Press

Thumb up and thumb downAhead of the ELT Journal debate at IATEFL 2014 in Harrogate, Graham Hall, editor of ELT Journal, presents an introduction to the motion of the debate.

The ongoing expansion of English language teaching for Primary age learners and teenagers has been a notable feature of ELT in recent years. In many countries, English is now compulsory in primary as well as secondary education, whilst English for Pre-school learners is also increasingly common. Some estimates suggest that up to 80 per cent of English language teaching globally is directed, in diverse contexts, at students in Primary or Secondary schools. As the exact cut-off point between Primary and Secondary education varies around the world, let’s assume for this blog that we’re referring to teaching children of pre- and/or post-11 years old).

As both parents and educational authorities seek to increase younger learners’ English language skills, we can’t assume that an earlier start…

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