英文ライティング添削講座-Support Writing Course for 2015

Originally posted on Group 1 for Kanagawa Teachers:

英文ライティング添削講座

Support Writing Course for 2015

at 神奈川県立国際言語文化アカデミア

A new academic year is here and now is a good time to practice writing.

So If you, or someone you know who is a junior high or high school English teacher in Kanagawa and is interested in working on their writing in English, please check this link for more details.

英文ライティング添削講座

http://www.pref.kanagawa.jp/cnt/f440038/p899374.html

5月28日- 7月23日
9月17日-12月9日

Thank you and we look forward to studying with you.

宜しくお願い致します。

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Keywords List – AntConc

Parise Peter:

A nice explanation of AntConc and its Keyword list function by Warren Tang.
I started using AntConc again for some qualitative research and discovered this while searching for advice. Thanks Warren for posting!

Originally posted on Warren M Tang:

The keywords list in AntConc is, as the name suggests, a tool to create a list of keywords. To do this your target corpus is compared to a reference corpus. The target and reference corpora do not need to be of the same size. The comparison is then done statistically. The statistics in AntConc used for this task are either chi-squared and log-likelihood.

In AntConc load your corpus or corpora. Go to Wordlist tab then click start.

make wordlist

Select the Tools Preference menu.

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References for my presentation at the Temple University Applied Linguistic Colloquium 2015

The presentation went well, learned a lot and for those who saw please have a look here, presentation posting on the way!

http://tesolpeter.renshuishere.com/references-for-my-presentation-at-the-temple-university-applied-linguistics-colloquium-2015/

吉田研作先生公開講座ー3月21日ー神奈川県立国際言語文化アカデミア

Parise Peter:

吉田研作先生のご講演は、私たちが英語教育の状況をより深く理解し、今後の方向性を見いだすための多くの示唆を与えてくれます。アカデミアホームページからぜひお申し込みください。
http://www.pref.kanagawa.jp/cnt/f7807/
Yoshida Kensaku is a very thought provoking, engaging researcher. Speaking from my own experience, after every lecture I have seen by him, I have a deeper understanding of English education in Japan. If you have a chance to hear him speak on March 21st by all means please attend. To register either fax the pdf or register at the Academia’s main site. http://www.pref.kanagawa.jp/cnt/f7807/

Originally posted on Group 1 for Kanagawa Teachers:

2015-01-29_0927

【定員】100人 定員を超えた場合は抽選。【受 講 料】無料
【申込期限】平成27年3月16日(月曜日)(必着)
事前のお申込みが必要ですが、抽選になり、ご受講ができなくなった
場合以外は特にこちらからの連絡はいたしませんので、当日、開講の
5分前までに当所においでください。(開場は9時30分です。)

申し込みダウンロードするためクリック

ロゴ2

吉田研作公開講座申し込み

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Personalised corpora for your students

Parise Peter:

A post about the value personalized selection for a pedagogical corpus.

Originally posted on TEFLtastic blog:

Perhaps the biggest problem with corpora is the fact that none of them are more than an approximation of the English that individual students will come across and/ or need. In fact, as I said in my last post, I think in many cases it is such a big problem that it leads to results that are worse than teachers and materials writers just taking an intelligent guess at what language to base classroom materials on. This post seeks to show one way in which both of those ends of that materials development spectrum could come together, improving both along the way.

The basic idea is to base materials and classes on the English that students are themselves most likely to come across. For most people outside English-speaking countries, I believe that these are probably the most useful sources and kinds of language:

  1. English words used in their language (abbreviations…

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Workshop on Micro-skills at the JALT 2014 Conference in Tsukuba, Japan

Hello everyone,
The In-Service Teacher Training Division of the Kanagawa Institute of Language and Culture is offering a workshop at this year’s Japan Association of Language Teachers International Conference at the Tsukuba International Congress Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.

Sun, Nov 23, 2:10 PM – 3:10 PM; Rm 405 B

  • Context: Junior/Senior High School
  • Content area: Teacher Education (TED)
  • Format: Workshop
  • Language: English and Japanese

The focus of this workshop is on micro-skills for teacher training and how it can help teachers of English prepare to meet the standards of educational policy in Japan.

In contrast to conventional teacher training, which consists mostly of lectures on teaching methodology we offer an alternative which starts with the idea that teaching is a “performance based” profession. To do this, the teacher needs to practice specific classroom related skills in the company of peers who can offer feedback.

 For an abstract and other information, please click the link.

http://jalt.org/2014/abstract.php?p=202

If you are at the conference please be sure to attend. Also this year each listing on the website allows comments so if you can support even online that would be a great help.
See you there,
Peter

#IATEFL – This house believes that Primary ELT does more harm than good

Parise Peter:

I think Professor Hall is accurate with his description of the situation of non-immersion countries, like Japan where I currently live and teach. The policy on primary school English education here seems to be going in the right direction, yet what needs be done is to provide adequate support for teachers and schools in order to make a successful transition.
In terms of the debate though, I think primary ELT does not do any harm. Teachers even here in Japan notice a difference in the attitudes students have for English which did not exist years ago. The change is a change of affect, in that they feel more ready for English in middle school now due to their exposure in primary school. This makes a big difference in my opinion.

Originally posted on Oxford University Press:

Thumb up and thumb downAhead of the ELT Journal debate at IATEFL 2014 in Harrogate, Graham Hall, editor of ELT Journal, presents an introduction to the motion of the debate.

The ongoing expansion of English language teaching for Primary age learners and teenagers has been a notable feature of ELT in recent years. In many countries, English is now compulsory in primary as well as secondary education, whilst English for Pre-school learners is also increasingly common. Some estimates suggest that up to 80 per cent of English language teaching globally is directed, in diverse contexts, at students in Primary or Secondary schools. As the exact cut-off point between Primary and Secondary education varies around the world, let’s assume for this blog that we’re referring to teaching children of pre- and/or post-11 years old).

As both parents and educational authorities seek to increase younger learners’ English language skills, we can’t assume that an earlier start…

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Don’t Believe Anyone Who Tells You Learning To Code Is Easy

Parise Peter:

This is just what I needed to read. A level headed approach to learning to code. Yes I have felt the fustration, the bordom, the perplexity of learning code. I really appreciate this post becasue Ray understands the process, and the coders’ secret (surfing google till you find the code, then copy and paste, which I too am quite guilty of but enjoy none the less.)
Also the best advice: follow the tutortial. This too is something I need to adopt becasue one book of Java I was reading was to write code for a determining the sale price of an item, which to me was understandable, but quite boring in terms of content. It was not enticing enough for me to write as a program. Probably the best thing to do is either find a more enaging tutorial or like Ray suggests, just go though the motions even though you don’t understand it. Sometimes the process, once completed, provides insights that would never have occured if you avoid the process.
Anyway click the link and read on….
Thank you Kate Ray for the suggestions, and the mental support!

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

Editor’s note: Kate Ray is the technical cofounder of scroll kit, a visual webpage creation tool that was recently acquired by WordPress.com. 

One of the most dangerous things I’ve seen happen to people who are just starting to code is being told that it’s easy.

Here’s what your brain does:

rage-programming2 Drawing by me. (I am better at coding than drawing.)

Most programming doesn’t require a special brain, but it’s more frustrating and messier than anyone lets on. There are thousands of enthusiastic blog posts, classes and apps that aim to entice you with the promise of a slick, unequivocal procedure for learning to code. They rarely mention the tedium of getting your environment set up (which, trust me, even the nicest of your programmer friends don’t want to help you with, because that stuff is mad frustrating and nobody remembers how they did it).

They don’t tell you that a lot…

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Fourth Annual Asian Conference on Language Learning April 17-20 2014 in Osaka, references and graditude!

Hello all,

First I want to thank Steve Cornwell and all of the staff, guest speakers, and all the wonderful people I met at the Osaka ACLL/ACTC 2014! I look forward to next years event and I strongly recommend this conference in order to get a broader view of languge teaching practice and research across Asia!

Regarding my presentation,  if you would like references to the literature I mentioned please click here.

Also since there has been a lot of interest in what we do with our writing program… here is the pdf of my powerpoint. Enjoy!

In addition, there will be a video coming up soon on how to make an example-driven style of feedback for writing, so please stay tuned….

My students say the absolute minimum

Parise Peter:

This is great adivce to the language teacher! I certainly agree with everything here but I am a little weary of giving stickers unless it is given sparingly. My answer to the forth point is to tell jokes in class if you are the teacher, particulary jokes that involve both L1 and L2 words. It could help students remember certian vocabulary if it is presented in a pun. But don’t overdo it though. My colleauges can attest to this!

Originally posted on Oxford University Press:

Solutions Speaking ChallengeZarina Subhan, an experienced teacher and teacher trainer, tackles the second of our Solutions Speaking Challenges: “My students say the absolute minimum”.

I find myself in the classroom in an unfamiliar position. It’s not the fact that I’ve given up teaching that makes this a new experience for me. It is the fact that I’m a student again. I’m learning Spanish and am sitting behind the desk, no longer the decision-maker who tells the learners what to do, but the student awaiting instructions and wondering if I understood them.

I’m rediscovering how uncertain, vulnerable and anxious it can feel to be a language student. Most of the reading, writing, listening, speaking and (most importantly) thinking in the target language (TL) happens in the classroom. I know I am there to improve my language; my motivation as an adult learner is high, yet I have to admit I could speak…

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